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Thursday, 8 November 2012

Nicotine addiction myth idea explored

 On my mission to discover why my body feels different vaping nicotine in eliquid rather than smoking cigarettes. I have begun to think that nicotine is not the only addictive chemical in cigarettes, and that something in tobacco more than nicotine is addictive. My eye fell on this paragraph below as I was reading this very boring report

"Research to understand dependence in relation to nicotine level, how reductions in nicotine affect tobacco use behaviors, and other constituents and components beyond nicotine that affect addiction of both combustible and noncombustible tobacco products will inform the FDA’s authority in this area." (my bold)

So they know. They KNOW.

I have already blogged a list of over 500 chemicals Tobacco Companies are allowed to add to tobacco.

Even while I was smoking, I found my body craved to smoke more with commercially produced cigarettes than if I rolled my own. The tobacco I smoked in my last years of smoking was supposed to be "natural tobacco". I certainly seemed to be less ruled by it. Perhaps that is why I could transition so easily to vaping?

My sister on the other hand  (thinking we have similar genes) cannot get off low nicotine cigarettes which presumably have loads of extra gunk added and were "forced" to be low nicotine by the past efforts of Tobacco Control. I think they made a bad error forcing Tobacco Companies to reduce nicotine in cigarettes. The result is, that people who smoke "mild", smoke MORE!  There is something really evil in my sister's cigarettes! She cannot do "home rollies" either - she HAS to have her "brand".  Nicotine does not sustain her. It is nicotine plus the unknown something in her cigarettes that has enslaved her.

Tobacco Control yabbing on about nicotine addiction "enslaving" us is, to my mind, not truthful.It's an addiction myth.










Research to understand dependence
in relation to nicotine level, how reductions in
nicotine affect tobacco use behaviors, and other constituents
and components beyond nicotine that affect addiction
of both combustible and noncombustible tobacco
products will inform the FDA’s authority in this area.